✸ The Master Butchers Singing Club Epub ✻ Author Louise Erdrich – Motyourdrive.co.uk


  • Paperback
  • 416 pages
  • The Master Butchers Singing Club
  • Louise Erdrich
  • English
  • 24 October 2018
  • 9780060837051

10 thoughts on “The Master Butchers Singing Club

  1. says:

    How does one review a book written by a true artistic voice and do justice to its telling One should not expect a synopsis here, that can easily be found elsewhere This is a beautiful, often painful novel.Although Louise Erdrich generally places emphasis on the Native American in her books, she has chosen to take a different route with this novel The occasional references to American Indians are by no means insignificant, however, but add spice to an already intriguing narrative Her many, varied characters have come alive on the pages to give the reader a sense of recognition throughout It is not difficult to develop feelings for these individuals, each with his or her intriguing situation Erdrich has plumbed the depths and peaks of the emotions of her characters with stark, lyrical realism Her narrative of the environment which existed for them was beautifully and palpably etched throughout.It is rare that I give a book a five star rating, but this seems to easily merit this place Although I feel that much can and should be said about this writer and her offering, I will continue to contemplate the messages that she has set down in her skillful writing.NOTE This review will be continued


  2. says:

    This book was incredibly frustrating Erdrich has plenty of skill setting up the beginning of a story she does it about twelve times but never manages to actually stay with any particular arc Stories and characters are established just enough to whet your interest, and then she just wanders to another one Think you ll be staying with Fidelis, the titular master butcher, after he travels from Germany to North Dakota Meh, he ll sort of be around, but you ll never get a better sense of how he ticks Want to know what the clear and immediate attraction between him and Delphine will lead to That story will totally peter out and happen pretty much offstage Interested in the murder mystery that gets set up, or the story of Delphine s friend None of these things will ever really be focused on You end up with a serious case of literary blue balls, wishing that the author had been as interested in her own characters as you are.


  3. says:

    Louise Erdrich s literary novels are filled with rainbows of different time periods in history, and include expanded lists of characters which could focus on different events and personalities and paints a colorful portrait of life, even if the hues are dark and uncompromising I guess her books are like certain gourmet foods An acquired taste If I can compare it with other books similar in ambiance, authors such as Amy Tan, Lisa See, Wiley Cash, Erskine Caldwell, Cormack McCarthy and Jonis Agee comes to mind.I enjoyed this novel set in North Dakota beginning after WWI and ending after WWII German immigrants settled down in a small town where Fidelis Waldvogel and his wife Eva opened up a butchery and try to fit into a new society Their paths crossed with local characters with which they form strong bonds, when Fidelis started the master butcher s singing club It became the story of women enduring tough challenges while being involved in different forms of relationships with men and among themselves It s not a book for the fainthearted since many brutalities adorn the plot and were often revolting However, the prose is beautiful in all its blas glory There s no other way of describing the captivating experience, although it took some guts at times to continue reading The Round House was my first encounter with this author s work The writing style is unique, authentic, grounded, honest and real Well, this is North Dakota noir, intense, Gothic and dark at times, but an unforgettable good reading experience Masterfully written In an inexplicable way I felt immensely enriched.


  4. says:

    This is a lumpy weird passionate sweep of a novel There was lots that irked me pacing that speeded up and then slowed way way down and the central passion seems hollow and mostly happens offstage but I read compulsively nonetheless Indeed, the book s real passions are the all the non couple pairings women friends, parents and children, adoptive parents, platonic male and female pairs and these relationships are intense and compelling and give the book a wonderfully rich texture It s just that we are supposed to believe that the earth moved when our hero and heroine so much as glanced at each other And that rang false But it ultimately doesn t matter because there s so much strange meaty life here The book is full of imagery about things that worm their way up out of cellars and soil, that won t stay buried, and the narrative is similarly constructed a North Dakota town in the middle of nowhere ends up being the knot where many threads of history and mystery come together The Native American genocide, World War I, the Holocaust it s all there, or you can just read this book as a quirky gothic family tale Unlike the recent Erdrich The Round House I read, this book is not didactic The Master Butchers Singing Club s slaughters of Native Americans, livestock, wild dogs are gutpunchingly stark and brutal an awful lot of dead things in this book , but the tone is never hectoring Ultimately, the book sprawls over its margins a bit A lot is started, and like life, only some of it is finished But the gritty, bloody, earthy vibrancy is very compelling and I forgave the book its lumpiness I will say that this book is not for the squeamish There were several extended sequences where I felt literally nauseous reading I quickly learned this was not a breakfast table book.


  5. says:

    Louise Erdrich is the Master writer story teller For me, one of the marks of a great writer is their ability to explain and make us feel human emotion and psychology that is subtle and virtually unexplainable This book is chuck full of such amazing and spot on observations about how people think and why they do what they do to each other The story covers the period from the end of WW1 through and beyond WW2 and is about a simple German fellow and his bride who move to the US for a better life and end up settling in a small town in North Dakota and then eke out an existence as a butcher with meat market At the same time, a local girl with a tough background living without a mother and only an alcoholic father, also eking out an existence with her boyfriend doing balancing acts and shows in nearby towns, meets the Germans and an interesting partnership is born Here are some additional random thoughts about the book and contain SPOILERS 1 The book is very graphic about the world of slaughtering animals, the smells, the cleaning rituals, the ruined hands, the bones molding in the back yard, dogs taking away carcasses and on and on She must have grown up on a farm and must have experienced first hand the elements of raising animals There wasn t much left to the imagination She tells the whole story and I was there experiencing it all with the family.2 Although the two wars and violence of both wars and the suffering and the odd position American Germans were in is written about, the historical aspect and history of the wars is a minor detail and not the main story The main story is the interaction over the years between an amazing and lovable female character and the German couple and their four children, most of it set in their meat market 3 The main female character is young and naive and has had a difficult life growing up Although the words homosexual or gay were not use then, her handsome and talented boyfriend turns out to be gay She actually discovers this by observing him having sex with another man in a hidden wooden area She was far enough hidden and away that she couldn t see the details of what was happening, but it was an excellent and heartbreaking sub story that seemed so very real that I had to wonder if the author went through something similar I had to keep thinking to myself that this author, who is three years younger than me and published the book 8 years ago, has been through a lot and has seen a lot and hasn t had a particularly easy life either.4 There were some minor disappointments Since her gay boyfriend was such a disappoint to her sexually, I was hoping we d get to hear that her relationship with the man who became her husband was stellar But there was never any mention of it That brings up another of the author s excellent writing skills Many of the relationships between male and females in the book are paced so carefully and occur with only minor incremental growth and progress that it was somewhat hard on me I wanted closure now, things to be easier and fixed like I hoped they eventually would be But it ended up that when I finally got what I hoped was coming, it was rewarding than it would have been.5 There is gruesome death here, genealogy that will floor you in the very last chapter, a little fun PG13 sex, death caused by war, extreme and realistic love and caring I didn t love the title of the book, but I did enjoy all of the comments about the singing club Give this one a try It is truly outstanding.


  6. says:

    VERY mixed feelings about this book The author has some beautifully worded sentences and an overall engaging story in the sense that it would have made a good screenplay however, what the author states in the included interview as to her intention for writing the book 1 to show the affects of war and 2 to show the difficulties of immigrants to build a life in a country devoid of familial support or the familiarity of cultural fortification was at best, used as a backdrop for a story about the friendship of two women Even the title is misleading as the importance of the club is not even effectively woven throughout the story, but disappears and then pops up at odd intervals The same could be said of the character from whose perspective the story is initially told he seems to be only a vehicle for introducing us to the two women upon whom the majority of the novel is focused.I finished the book thinking that the author s intentions were very poorly implemented and that I felt shorted by the fact the novel left me with no entertaining questions or themes other than wondering why it deserved to be published.


  7. says:

    Actual rating 3.5 starsWhen I first started reading The Master Butchers Singing Club, my initial response was Not another war book as I am not a fan of war fiction Both World Wars do feature in the book, but they do not overpower the story, for which I am very thankful.I don t think that I have ever before consciously encountered a book set in the period between the two World Wars and that is odd it s a very rich period of history to explore The author s style reminded me strongly of Canadian author Robertson Davies a compliment coming from me, as I adore his Deptford series, which also deals with small town characters Her characters are very unique and yet they are ordinary people, living ordinary lives in many ways Alcoholics, orphans, poor people, butchers, singers, Native people, circus people, murderers, undertakers, pilots, children, all making their way through the world as best they can Erdrich doesn t make them flamboyantly odd, just the regular peculiar that one finds in small communities It strikes me that this could have been a Canadian book the northern U.S shares many environmental and cultural threads with Canada, I think.This is probably also the best depiction of a love triangle that I have ever encountered in literature Several triangle relationships hinge on Fidelis, the master butcher His wife Eva and her friend Delphine His sister Tante and Delphine Fidelis, Delphine and Cyprian And yet, as his name would indicate, Fidelis is faithful to each of the women in his life view spoiler He is the provider for Eva until her death, considers Tante until she returns to Germany, and waits until he is sure that Cyprian is truly gone before proposing to Delphine hide spoiler


  8. says:

    Louise Erdrich likes to sneak up behind us and surprise us with what we already know but are trying to forget.Death and life are the same Our own lives lead us towards our own deaths as we live from the proteins that we harvest from those other living creatures killed for our nourishment And we, ourselves, live and die for the nourishment of others.That which we see around us is so much than we suspect but is hidden from us by, not only our own self imposed illusions, but also by the deceptions imposed upon us by others for our own, and their own, protection.This book plays out those realities in ways that confuse and deceive us so that we may then learn for ourselves that which we have forgotten.This is one gem and Louise Erdrich keeps making jewelery.


  9. says:

    Sort of a The Shipping News meets Fargo, set in the 1920s, 30s, and 40s The characterizations are uneven and spazzy the narrative unaccountably choppy but Erdrich does captivate and compel here and there.The best part is the amazing descriptions of food breakfast of cheese and bread and stewed prunes coriander, pepper, and apple wood smoked pork, a rich odor, clean and bloody and delicious.every mood of red twenty or thirty cuts of meat, summer sausage, liver sausage, beer sausage, veal, blood, Swedish, Italian and smoked pepper sausage, glistening hearts and liver and pale calf thymus, sweetbreads, as well as a great box of the delicately spiced, unsmoked, boiled wieners Try this lard For fish, it is good Pure as butter fresh coffee and a cinnamon bun exquisistely dotted with raisins and sugar and butter Old World Quality sausages prepared with the simplicity and perfection common in the German street Marzipan Herring Pickles with the right degree of spice Rolls as soft a jar of dark, cold, homemade beer strong black Turkish coffee cold butter cut into flour for a pastry pies for the Fourth of July supper to cut the booze a crock of beans laced with hot mustard, brown sugar and black strap molasses A bowl of oatmeal steaming hot, butter melting in a pool with a lump or two of dark brown sugar Cream Sometimes eggs or toast a Hungarian style goulash, a thick stew of braised meat in paprika sauce, ladled over spaetzle Sour cream topping it a stack of pancakes studded with the last of the sweet wild blue saskatoons Dabbed butter on the top Drizzled on a little maple syrup lemon pound cake fish in bacon grease a baked potato, bacon drippings spooned into the soft meal a plate of beans baked in tomato sauce, a large beer sausage, and half a sweet onion kidney gravy and mashed potato pie creamy oyster soup in a shallow bowl, crackers stuck all the way around it, peppered, a lump of butter on top Traumfeuer on a hard piece of sweet bread and a bit of cream dumpling soup chocolate so dark it is almost black, that tastes of oranges light cheese spread on toasted rolls in the morning, and jams of all kinds Marmalade sugar cookies in the shapes of animals, fried doughnuts, sausages, bread, hard cheese, apples, and bottles of beer creamed chicken, creamed corn and spinach, mashed potatoes with butter and cream, pies and cookies set out on doilies cut of white paper Country bread thickly spread with real sweet butter, ham perfectly smoked, cured, and cut fresh in a generous slab sauerbraten everywhere we go, or forest venison


  10. says:

    I love Louise Erdrich Love her.She is such a nuanced, intelligent, talented writer.I would read anything she writes I d read her shopping list.Even her weaker novels and there have been one or two are worth the read, simply for her lyricism and the way she elevates the act of storytelling into an art form.The Master Butchers Singing Club is, I m happy to say, one of her best Highly recommended.


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The Master Butchers Singing Clubcharacters The Master Butchers Singing Club, audiobook The Master Butchers Singing Club, files book The Master Butchers Singing Club, today The Master Butchers Singing Club, The Master Butchers Singing Club 6d33e From National Book Award Winning, New York Times Bestselling Author Louise Erdrich, A Profound And Enchanting New Novel A Richly Imagined World Where Butchers Sing Like Angels Having Survived World War I, Fidelis Waldvogel Returns To His Quiet German Village And Marries The Pregnant Widow Of His Best Friend, Killed In Action With A Suitcase Full Of Sausages And A Master Butcher S Precious Knife Set, Fidelis Sets Out For America In Argus, North Dakota, He Builds A Business, A Home For His Family Which Includes Eva And Four Sons And A Singing Club Consisting Of The Best Voices In Town When The Old World Meets The New In The Person Of Delphine Watzka The Great Adventure Of Fidelis S Life Begins Delphine Meets Eva And Is Enchanted She Meets Fidelis, And The Ground Trembles These Momentous Encounters Will Determine The Course Of Delphine S Life, And The Trajectory Of This Brilliant Novel


About the Author: Louise Erdrich

a book description

Author Biography

Louise Erdrich is one of the most gifted, prolific, and challenging of contemporary Native American novelists Born in 1954 in Little Falls, Minnesota, she grew up mostly in Wahpeton, North Dakota, where her parents taught at Bureau of Indian Affairs schools Her fiction reflects aspects of her mixed heritage German through her father, and French and Ojibwa through her mother She worked at various jobs, such as hoeing sugar beets, farm work, waitressing, short order cooking, lifeguarding, and construction work, before becoming a writer She attended the Johns Hopkins creative writing program and received fellowships at the McDowell Colony and the Yaddo Colony After she was named writer in residence at Dartmouth, she married professor Michael Dorris and raised several children, some of them adopted She and Michael became a picture book husband and wife writing team, though they wrote only one truly collaborative novel, The Crown of Columbus 1991.

The Antelope Wife was published in 1998, not long after her separation from Michael and his subsequent suicide Some reviewers believed they saw in The Antelope Wife the anguish Erdrich must have felt as her marriage crumbled, but she has stated that she is unconscious of having mirrored any real life events.

She is the author of four previous bestselling andaward winning novels, including Love Medicine The Beet Queen Tracks and The Bingo Palace She also has written two collections of poetry, Jacklight, and Baptism of Desire. Her fiction has been honored by the National Book Critics Circle 1984 and The Los Angeles Times 1985 , and has been translated into fourteen languages

Several of her short stories have been selected for O Henry awards and for inclusion in the annual Best American Short Story anthologies The Blue Jay s Dance, a memoir of motherhood, was her first nonfiction work, and her children s book, Grandmother s Pigeon, has been published by Hyperion Press She lives in Minnesota with her children, who help her run a small independent bookstore called The Birchbark.