[EPUB] ✿ Orley Farm ❄ Anthony Trollope – Motyourdrive.co.uk



10 thoughts on “Orley Farm

  1. says:

    The characters of Joseph Mason and his stepmother Lady Mason, so sharply contrasted are consistent and totally believable So are the former s resentment, smouldering for 20 years, and the strain on the latter, held at bay for the same period until her resolution is exhausted.


  2. says:

    This is perhaps the most unusual of all Trollope s books The ending is quite extraordinary, morally outrageous even today or perhaps especially in this day and age, just absolutely disgusting Trollope writes these long sagas that contain multiple small plots, usually romantic, and writes the characters so well that you get quite involved and this book does not disappoint in this The plot seems to have been written about in just about every review so there is no point in the artificial drama This is perhaps the most unusual of all Trollope s books The ending is quite extraordinary, morally outrageous even today or perhaps especially in this day and age, just absolutely disgusting Trollope writes these long sagas that contain multiple small plots, usually romantic, and writes the characters so well that you get quite involved and this book does not disappoint in this The plot seems to have been written about in just about every review so there is no point in the artificial drama of putting a spoiler here, although personally I really am not keen on reviews that aresynopses of the book I like to read what people thought of a bookthan what the book was about.A young man comes of age and takes control of the property he inherited away from his mother who has been in control until then He isn t a bad lad but he thinks he knowsabout business than he does and his first action is to evict the tenant farmer so that he might put the land toprofitable use himself The impestuous young lad s father who had owned the land had dispossessed his eldest son and left it to his son by his second wife by means of a codicil to his Will, signed by a couple of servants This Will had been tested in court by the eldest son, the rightful heir, but he had lost.The farmer had known that the codicil was not genuine but since he was benefiting from the land, had said nothing for all these years Now, though, enraged by his summary eviction, he goes after revenge.Lady Mason, the beautiful, relatively young widow, marshalls all possible support, legal and otherwise for the defence of the Will and her good name, but eventually confesses to a friend that she did indeed forge both the codicil and the signatures which were on a completely different legal document.The case comes to court, the lawyer makes a total fool of one of the witnesses to the codicil, as lawyers do, and the Lady Mason wins the case The eldest son naturally would have had to pay costs and his name would be quite damaged bringing two cases calling an aristocratic lady, his stepmother, a forger and a perjurer However, since quite a few people now know that she is indeed a criminal she cedes the land to the rightful inheritor, her stepson, and then, with her son, goes abroad to live a life of ease and luxury, keeping both her money and her good name.Outrageous But an excellent book, perhaps the best of Trollope s marvellous stories I so enjoyed reading it and was so furious at the end my son said, What are you shouting at Recommended for classics fans and those who think they are deadly dull, all Dickens paid for by the word boring or sly romances like Austen which I love This is something else, a brilliant read


  3. says:

    Hefty but not heavy love, loss, iron furniture, legal shenanigans, humour, guilt, revenge, redemption, rat catching, misunderstanding, a moulded wife and .This is a standalone Trollope novel, originally published in instalments of two or three short chapters the 800 pages race by Further page turnability comes from numerous characters and sub plots, coupled with quite a gossipy tone, and occasional catty asides It was his most celebrated novel in his lifetime, but sadly, it is less Hefty but not heavy love, loss, iron furniture, legal shenanigans, humour, guilt, revenge, redemption, rat catching, misunderstanding, a moulded wife and .This is a standalone Trollope novel, originally published in instalments of two or three short chapters the 800 pages race by Further page turnability comes from numerous characters and sub plots, coupled with quite a gossipy tone, and occasional catty asides It was his most celebrated novel in his lifetime, but sadly, it is less well known now PlotThe basic plot is explained at the outset, and I expect most readers guess the gist of the outcome quite early on Lady Mason was the young second wife of on old land owning widower they lived at Orley Farm, while the adult son Joseph Mason lived in the main family estate, Groby Shortly after their son Lucius was born, the old man died, and contrary to what he d told his elder son, a codicil to his will left Orley Farm to his infant son The will was challenged, but the codicil upheld Twenty years later, when this book is set, it is challenged again Lady Mason may be charged with forgery or perjury.It s not quite fiction as Oscar Wilde s Miss Prism defined the word, but nearly so.Justice and The LawThe law is at the heart of the book Trollope s father was a lawyer , along with the idea that it does not necessarily equate with justice The process is explained clearly enough, and the courtroom scenes have the dramatic tension of the best TV dramas We have retained a system which contains many of the barbarities of the feudal times we teach him the defendant to lie in his own defence. Trollope s concerns are moral, channelled mainly through Lucius Mason lawyers are all liars and young lawyer Felix Graham In particular, is it ethical to defend someone if you think or even know they are guilty, and to what extent does payment cloud that, especially when it means the rich can buy justice that the poor can t as they can also buy warmer winter coats The older Furnival s conscience iseasily accommodated than that of the idealistic Graham He had learned as lawyers do learn to believe his own case. Powerful barrister Chaffenbrass thinks it s fine to acquit the guilty if they can support themselves, because it saves the crown money I assume he wouldn t extend that to rape or murder He was always true to the man whose money he had taken. Image Scales of justice, and shadow Source No amount of eloquence will make an English lawyer think that loyalty to the truth should come before loyalty to his client. But is that good or bad The guilty still need someone to plead for them You could insert a religious analogy here, but in this novel, the message of Christian repentance and forgiveness comes instead from Lady Mason s friend, Mrs Orme In fact, in some ways, this book has a stronger Christian message than the Barchester novels with their overtly church related themes.Putting aside the rules of law, moral justice is harder to define doing the wrong thing, to selflessly right a wrong may still be wrong, but how much leniency, if any, should there be How does the passage of time affect guilt, punishment and restitution What does the innocent beneficiary of a crime owe the victim If the victim is unpleasant and vindictive, how does one cast that bias aside Trivia Even those who support the death penalty for crimes such as murder might be shocked to learn that forgery was a capital offence until 1830, only a few years before this was written and set Comical CommerceDespite some dubious ethics, most of the lawyers are likeable, and for contrast, there are some commercial travellers They provide plenty of humour especially when explaining the etiquette of the Commercial Dining Room in an inn , as well as examples of ethical quandaries of a less intellectual kind Characters and their NamesTrollope is good at drawing characters of all sorts rich, poor, aspirant, falling, male, female, young and old He sometimes comes close to caricature, but knows where to draw the line There are some good names, and unlike some of his Barsetshire novels, they re not quite ludicrous It s no surprise that Samuel Dockwrath is angry about his loss that Round and Crook are lawyers, as are Slow and Bideawhile Kantwise is quick witted salesman an apothecary is called Balsam Mary Snow is on a pedestal Bridget Bolster is made of stern stuff, and Chaffenbrass is good in court interrogation.WomenFor a Victorian man, Trollope can be surprisingly insightful about women though he s not afraid to portray nasty ones either Those of most interest here include Lady Mason is the central character, and unlike Lily Dale The Small House at Allington , she is plausibly complex, as is her situation The reader s feelings towards her vary, which is a compliment to the writing Mrs Orme is, like Lady Mason, a woman in her early forties, widowed for around twenty years Her situation is rather different she lives with her father in law, Sir Peregrine Orme, and son Perry but her love and loyalty practical and emotional are beautiful Sophia Furnival is a fascinating young woman fiercely intelligent, but born a few generations too soon to follow her father into the law something she would undoubtedly be good at Mrs Furnival loves her husband, and is proud of his success but she struggles with the price of that success Her husband is often away, so she suspects infidelity She doesn t find solace in her new social position either she can t butter toast on her lap, and tea is made in the kitchen, poured by servants Mary Snow was the motherless daughter of a feckless father, adopted as a ward by a benefactor, who then trained her up to be a moulded wife It s described as if this was a known idea at the time The complications of this arrangement are explored.Lucius Mason is forward thinking he declares that women have minds equal to those of men , though in an earlier chapter, Trollope suggests that Joseph Mason would be justified in deserting, beating or locking up his awful wife It may be relevant that although Trollope s father was not very successful, his mother was a celebrated novelist who was able to support the family ParentingLaw may be the overt theme, but relationships between parents and young adult children are really the core of most of the plots and sub plots, and as a parent of a young adult, they were what chimed most with me Old Joseph Mason s provision for his two sons caused problems Death and money are often troublesome companions we should strive to bequeath peace and harmony in how we leave our affairs Lady Mason s court cases affect her relationship with her son and his position in society Everything she does, she does for him, and he loves her unquestioningly But Mary Snow s father virtually sells her, but is her benefactor cum suitor any better Distasteful as this is in modern times, I think his motives were honourable, albeit very misplaced Judge Stavely and his wife are very liberal in how much freedom they give their daughters in choosing who to marry They believe a child should be allowed, as far as was practical, to do what they liked because the child if properly trained, would like those things which were good for them I broadly agree, but there s no guarantee The Stavelys freedom even allows a game of Blind Man s Buff where you can feel, you know MarriageYou could write a lengthy essay comparing the huge variety of marriages and potential ones portrayed here We see a wealthy man, living in virtual poverty because of his stingy wife who makes sure she does not go without herself , the corrosive effect of suspicion, a dubious form of well intentioned grooming, sacrificial love, the pressure of having 14 children, and a commercial traveller who likes to keep his wife on her toes by not telling her when he ll be home He might keep her always on alert an ready for marital inspection. There is a gentleness in the way even the unhappy ones are rendered that avoids conjuring prurience, and a light joy in the happy couples Social boundaries are challenged some characters bow to them, and some do not It illustrates that there is no single template for marriage that works for all, and that what works for one couple at one stage in their lives, may need changing later on I was reminded of a recent radio interviewee who was asked about how he and his wife had been happily married for over 30 years He said he d actually been married three times the interviewer sounded flustered and then explained that he d only ever been married to the same woman, but that their relationship had evolved, so it was almost like three different marriages.The permutations of courting couples, and the way some of them play one off another lend a Shakespearean air at times different combinations of who might end up with who, and various impediments some of which vanish without further explanation.Tome, Language, and GrammarTrollope quite often addresses the reader directly, giving his reasons for why he s telling the story in the way he is For example, The heroine must by a certain fixed law be young and marriageable and promises that at least one such will be forthcoming He also contradicts himself, to mildly comic effect For instance, saying It would be needless to tell and immediately telling it The occasionally gossipy tone is sometimes used, conspiratorially, to the reader, but is also demonstrated by Martha Biggs in particular She takes a salacious interest in the troubles of her friend s marriage, and wants to knowher soul sighed for a talepiquant than one of mere general neglect It could not be expected that she would sympathise with generalities for ever When she can t hear the argument she expects, she let the battle rage in her imagination She has some succour, and later, her mind deliciously filled with the anticipation of coming catastrophes Some friend It s instructive to read period literature and be reminded how language has changed Constructions and spellings that some abhor as shocking modern errors or Americanisms are common in respected British books of the past all of them do not have. gotten relegated to American English nowadays stept across yet we do still use burnt, spilt, spelt etc insure and intrust , where we would now use ensure and entrust Hyphenation changes now a days, some one, to night, to morrow Stupid is as stupid does may have been famously said by Forrest Gump s mother, but it s said by a sharp tongued salesman here Kantwise not so cute in the ways of having much to say Other Quotes He looked as though a skin rather too small for the purpose had been drawn over his head and face His nose seemed to have been compressed almost into nothing by that skin squeezing operation it had all the properties of a line length without breadth Mrs Mason is comically mean, even to guests A servant serves lunch the covers were removed with a magnificent action of his arm which I am inclined to think was not innocent of irony a large dish selected by the cook with some similar attempt at sarcasm and bearing three scraps, as to the nature of which Mr Dockwrath, though he looked hard at them, was unable to enlighten himself A frustrated husband, Instead of counting up her virtues, he counted up his own Trollope observes that failing to love and cherish a spouse is as much a breaking of marriage vows as the betrayal he is suspected of an intermeddling little busybody Since the domestic rose would no longer yield him honey, he would seek his sweets from the stray honeysuckle on which there grew no thorns Legal gentlemen are quite as often bought off as bought up Mrs Mason would not on any account have missed church It was a cheap duty and therefore rigidly performed He must now either assure her by a lie or break down all her hopes by the truth Novels are the only chance a man has when he s laid up like that a solitary candle, which only seemed to make the gloom of the large room visible She did wander about the house, as though there were something always to be done in some place apart from that in which she then was Having dressed his face with that romantic sobriety he had been practising He was a man who looked his best when under a cloud, and shone the brightest when everything about him was dark Lucius Mason


  4. says:

    Did Lady Mason forge her late husband s will We learn the answer to that question early enough, but that is not the point to this story Her guilt or innocence is beside the point We must hear from the British class system And, ofconsequence, what of the British system of justice The word verdict comes from the Latin veredictum, and literally means to say the truth Then, now, here, there do not imagine that that hallowed derivation is reality I have an idea that all lawyers Did Lady Mason forge her late husband s will We learn the answer to that question early enough, but that is not the point to this story Her guilt or innocence is beside the point We must hear from the British class system And, ofconsequence, what of the British system of justice The word verdict comes from the Latin veredictum, and literally means to say the truth Then, now, here, there do not imagine that that hallowed derivation is reality I have an idea that all lawyers are liars, a character says early on Trollope and this was my first Trollope shows us that some are and some are not His cynicism isnuanced than that of the quoted character, but enough so that he understands a trial is not a search for the truth Speaking as the author to the reader Trollope intrudes himself in this way, but not annoyingly Trollope says, I cannot understand how any gentleman can be willing to use his intellect for the propagation of untruth, and to be paid for so using it The case is deemed to need the services of the brilliant Mr Chaffanbrass, who well understood that the defence of injured innocence was no part of his mission Another lawyer is Solomon Aram, highly skilled, acutely aware but a Jew Trollope deals with the anti Semitism matter of factly It made me wince for all the Realism of it, but made me also think ofThen, now, here, there.One witness tried to tell the truth but he was spectacularly no good at it, so bad in fact that the trial judge charged the jury that they could take it as a given that the witness was stupid With friends after the trial, the poor witness hangs his head, as despondent as a soul can be One friend, in a fortified attempt at commiseration, says what does it matter if all the judges in the land was to call him stupid To which another friend solemnly intones, Stupid is as stupid does So, do not believe that Forrest Gump said it first.This will not be my last Trollope.___________________________________ This reminded me, repeatedly, of a scene from Pete Dexter s Paris Trout Mrs McNutt is on the stand and being cross examinedI told the truth about it You can make it look any which way now, but I told how it happened.Seagraves said, That s what we called the jury for, to decide She turned then, looking directly at them They don t decide what happened, she said It s already done All they decide is if they gone do something about it


  5. says:

    When people ask me, David, you re obviously a complete nut when it comes to Trollope I ve never read one of his novels, and he wrote so damned many Which one should I try , this is the one I recommend Some in the Barsetshire and Palliser series may be better, but the first book in each of those series is below standard for Trollope I don t want anyone to embark on those until they know Trollope can deliver the goods And deliver the goods he does in Orley Farm.The plot revolves around a When people ask me, David, you re obviously a complete nut when it comes to Trollope I ve never read one of his novels, and he wrote so damned many Which one should I try , this is the one I recommend Some in the Barsetshire and Palliser series may be better, but the first book in each of those series is below standard for Trollope I don t want anyone to embark on those until they know Trollope can deliver the goods And deliver the goods he does in Orley Farm.The plot revolves around a will Sir Joseph Mason dies with a will that leaves everything to his second son, the son of his second wife, the much younger, beautiful Lady Mason, and nothing to his son by an earlier marriage Did Lady Mason forge this will Trollope early on lets us know the answer to this question It s typical of his approach to narrative He almost disdains plots and twists, or says he does, and seems to want to be rid of any reader who is reading just to find out the answer to what could have been a mystery, saying in effect If this is the only reason you re reading this, here s the answer Satisfied Now please go away Anyone who has come to love Trollope knows that the joy of reading him has nothing to do with twists and turns of plot If you re the type for Trollope, you ll stay to the end, even when you know the answer to the forgery question.Trollope s father was a barrister, although an utter failure at the bar, and Trollope s lawyers are wonderful The much feared Chaffanbrass, whom Trollope introduced in The Three Clerks and who will appear again in Phineas Redux, appears here in all his glory His skill at cross examination lies not so much in wringing the truth from liars as in making the most innocent and honest of witnesses come across as the sneakiest of perjurers Also representing Lady Mason in the will contest is Sir Thomas Furnival The portrait of the Furnival marriage, and its gradual disintegration as Sir Thomas becomes smitten, almost innocently, with Lady Mason, is Trollope at his best


  6. says:

    The plot of Orley Farm is as complex and multilayered as we have come to expect from the pen of Anthony Trollope And the narrative is as filled with authorial asides and conversations between Trollope and his readers as we have come to enjoy This is a book to be read in a leisurely manner, without any urgency or rushing Characterizations are brilliant and individual, and plot lines interweave and separate, creating a tapestry that is always of a whole but with distinctive shades and nuances The plot of Orley Farm is as complex and multilayered as we have come to expect from the pen of Anthony Trollope And the narrative is as filled with authorial asides and conversations between Trollope and his readers as we have come to enjoy This is a book to be read in a leisurely manner, without any urgency or rushing Characterizations are brilliant and individual, and plot lines interweave and separate, creating a tapestry that is always of a whole but with distinctive shades and nuances in every chapter.Early in the novel a destabilizing event occurs Twenty years after a dispute about property has apparently been resolved in the courts, a new document is found that triggers a reprise of old contentions and events with results that are unclear until near the very end The reader is left guessing and hypothesizing at every turn Told in the third person omniscient voice, the story winds and meanders, many characters developing and changing over time, none entirely admirable, few entirely despicable Trollope s obligatory fox hunt makes its predictable appearance Descriptions are delightful, names are clever, diction and syntax please the ear Trollope takes the opportunity in this novel to explore the ethics and s of the legal profession and the justice system even as he indulges himself in the unraveling of love triangles among several families There is a rhythm to his writing that carries the reader along endlessly, and subtexts, hidden motives, and secrets abound.This is a delightful book, one of many by this prolific Victorian novelist


  7. says:

    In a word, wow Dare I say it Yes, I prefer Trollope to Dickens less sentimental andfully formed characters Another novel about the machinations of the legal system and how reputations are made and lost with honor and integrity making merely a cameo appearance Trollope confirms the protagonist s guilt in the first few pages so the question to be answered is whether she ll get off or not I really should go back and read Bleak House again to compare and contrast the two.


  8. says:

    Loved this book.Even though we know the outcome Trollope just draws you in.Found this utterly compelling.Wonderful characters some to love and some to hate.Is Lady Mason guilty You will have to read to find out


  9. says:

    The plot did Lady Mason forge her husband s will to gain his estate for her infant son covers familiar Trollope territory the promptings of conscience versus financial safety Trollope s most interesting characters are those for whom the question is never clear cut Here s Lady Mason, considering how a possible second marriage could affect the forgery case being brought against her.Then she sat herself down, and began to look her future world in the face Two questions she had to ask Would The plot did Lady Mason forge her husband s will to gain his estate for her infant son covers familiar Trollope territory the promptings of conscience versus financial safety Trollope s most interesting characters are those for whom the question is never clear cut Here s Lady Mason, considering how a possible second marriage could affect the forgery case being brought against her.Then she sat herself down, and began to look her future world in the face Two questions she had to ask Would it be well for her that this marriage should take place and would it be well for him In an off hand way she had already answered both questions but she had done so by feeling rather than by thought.No doubt she would gain much in the coming struggle by such a position as Sir Peregrine would give her It did seem to her that Mr Dockwrath and Joseph Mason would hardly dare to bring such a charge as that threatened against the wife of Sir Peregrine Orme And then, too, what evidence as to character would be so substantial as the evidence of such a marriage But how would Mr Furnival her lawyer bear it, and if he were offended would it be possible that the fight should be fought without him No that would be impossible The lawyer s knowledge, experience, and skill were as necessary to her as the baronet s position and character But why should Mr Furnival be offended by such a marriage She did not know, she said to herself She could not see that there should be cause of offence But yet some inner whisper of her conscience told her that there would be offence Must Mr Furnival be told and must he be told at once That deep character POV is another Trollope speciality and a way of bringing his readers into a reluctant sense of sympathy with his flawed heroine But it s also a way of showing moral development every time we are taken into Lady Mason s POV, although superficially she appears to be going over the same points again and again, in fact her position shifts imperceptibly each time So when finally view spoiler she admits the forgery hide spoiler we feel that we have been on the journey with her I love that Trollope uses such simple language and situations he doesn t use any of Dickens flowery rhetoric, melodramatic flourishes or OTT characters His drama is forged from everyday incidents, and presented with a deceptive simplicity The following scene is ostensibly about hunting Trollope uses no stage directions in the scene, there s no physical description at all but for all that, there s a strong sense not just of the characters but of a parallel unspoken conversation that s happening at the same time May we go as far as the wood said Miss Furnival to Augustus Stavely Without being made to ride over hedges, I mean Oh, dear, yes and ride about the wood half the day It will be an hour and a half before a fox will break even if he ever breaks Dear me how tired you will be of us Now do say something pretty, Mr Staveley It s not my m tier We shall be tired, not of you, but of the thing Galloping up and down the same cuts in the wood for an hour and a half is not exciting nor does it improve the matter much if we stand still, as one should do by rights That would be very slow You need not be afraid They never do here Everybody will be rushing about as though the very world depended on their galloping I m so glad that s just what I like Everybody except Lord Alston, Miss Tristram, and, the other old stagers They will husband their horses, and come out as fresh at two o clock as though they were only just out There is nothing so valuable as experience in hunting Do you think it nice seeing a young lady with so much hunting knowledge Now you want me to talk slander, but I won t do it I admire the Miss Tristrams exceedingly, and especially Julia And which is Julia The youngest that one riding by herself And why don t you go and express your admiration Ah, me why don t we all express the admiration that we feel, and pour sweet praises into the ears of the lady that excites it Because we are cowards, Miss Furnival, and are afraid even of such a weak thing as a woman Dear me I should hardly have thought that you would suffer from such terror as that Because you don t quite know me, Miss Furnival And Miss Julia Tristram is the lady that has excited it If it be not she, it is some other fair votary of Diana at present riding into Monkton Wood Ah, now you are giving me a riddle to guess, and I never guess riddles I won t even try at it But they all seem to be stopping Yes, they are putting the hounds into covert Now if you want to show yourself a good sportsman, look at your watch You see that Julia Tristram has got hers in her hand What s that for To time the hounds to see how long they ll be before they find It s very pretty work in a small gorse, but in a great wood like this I don t care much for being so accurate But for heaven s sake don t tell Julia Tristram I should not have a chance if she thought I was so slack Lovely subtle stuff


  10. says:

    Did Lady Mason forge her late husband s will We learn the answer to that question early enough, but that is not the point to this story Her guilt or innocence is beside the point We must hear from the British class system And, ofconsequence, what of the British system of justice The word verdict comes from the Latin veredictum, and literally means to say the truth Then, now, here, there do not imagine that that hallowed derivation is reality I have an idea that all lawyers Did Lady Mason forge her late husband s will We learn the answer to that question early enough, but that is not the point to this story Her guilt or innocence is beside the point We must hear from the British class system And, ofconsequence, what of the British system of justice The word verdict comes from the Latin veredictum, and literally means to say the truth Then, now, here, there do not imagine that that hallowed derivation is reality I have an idea that all lawyers are liars, a character says early on Trollope and this was my first Trollope shows us that some are and some are not His cynicism isnuanced than that of the quoted character, but enough so that he understands a trial is not a search for the truth Speaking as the author to the reader Trollope intrudes himself in this way, but not annoyingly Trollope says, I cannot understand how any gentleman can be willing to use his intellect for the propagation of untruth, and to be paid for so using it The case is deemed to need the services of the brilliant Mr Chaffanbrass, who well understood that the defence of injured innocence was no part of his mission Another lawyer is Solomon Aram, highly skilled, acutely aware but a Jew Trollope deals with the anti Semitism matter of factly It made me wince for all the Realism of it, but made me also think ofThen, now, here, there.One witness tried to tell the truth but he was spectacularly no good at it, so bad in fact that the trial judge charged the jury that they could take it as a given that the witness was stupid With friends after the trial, the poor witness hangs his head, as despondent as a soul can be One friend, in a fortified attempt at commiseration, says what does it matter if all the judges in the land was to call him stupid To which another friend solemnly intones, Stupid is as stupid does So, do not believe that Forrest Gump said it first.This will not be my last Trollope.___________________________________ This reminded me, repeatedly, of a scene from Pete Dexter s Paris Trout Mrs McNutt is on the stand and being cross examined I told the truth about it You can make it look any which way now, but I told how it happened.Seagraves said, That s what we called the jury for, to decide She turned then, looking directly at them They don t decide what happened, she said It s already done All they decide is if they gone do something about it less


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Orley Farm download Orley Farm, read online Orley Farm, kindle ebook Orley Farm, Orley Farm 8ad1c81a1d8f With Its Concern For Social Issues And Its Extensive Coverage Of Middle Class And Landed Life, Orley Farm Is A Novel That Demands Attention In The Rich Field Of Nineteenth Century Fiction